Verb + Preposition Combinations (Part 1) 2

The materials on this page have been prepared by Kenneth Beare (About.com Guide), put together and moved to English-learners.com by Ehsan Shams.

 

Verbs + About

The following verbs are commonly used with ‘about’. Each verb + about combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • be about something:  That book is about his experiences in Africa.
  • argue about (doing) something: The boys argued about which bus to take.
  • be concerned about (doing) something: I’m concerned about your grades.
  • be worried about (doing) something: She is worried about her exams.
  • boast about (doing) something: Thomas boasted about his golfing ability.
  • decide about (doing) something: Anna decided about her goals.
  • dream about (doing) something: Mark dreams about becoming a ballet dancer.
  • protest about (doing) something: The students protested about the invasion.

 

Verbs + Against

 

The following verbs are commonly used with ‘against’. Each verb + against combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • be against something / someone: I am against the new regulation.
     
  • insure something against something: We insured our house against storm damage.
     
  • protest against (doing) something: The students are protesting against the invasion.

 

Verbs + At

 

The following verbs are commonly used with ‘at’. Each verb + at combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • be at something: The exhibition is at the modern art gallery.
     
  • glance at something: Can I glance at that for a moment?
     
  • guess at something: She guessed at the answer.
     
  • hint at something: My mom hinted at my present.
     
  • marvel at something: I marvel at your math abilities.

 

Verbs + For

 

The following verbs are commonly used with ‘for’. Each verb + for combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • be for something / someone: I’m for Mayor Martini.
  • account for something: That accounts for his success.
  • allow for something: I think you need to allow for misunderstandings.
  • apologize for something / someone: Jackson apologized for his rude behavior.
  • blame someone for (doing) something: I blame Janet for the broken pottery.
  • care for (doing) something / someone: He doesn’t care for playing golf.
  • charge someone for (doing) something: The accountant charged him $400 for his advice.
  • count for something: Your good marks count for 50% of your grade.
  • earmark something for a use: Congress earmarked $6 million for safety improvements.
  • pay for someone / something: Let me pay for Tom.

2 thoughts on “Verb + Preposition Combinations (Part 1)

  1. shaqayeq Mar 31,2011 11:50 am

    u r UNIQUE. Luv d page, n U more  😉

  2. maria Apr 1,2011 3:58 am

    Please, tell me: Is it american english or britanic english?

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