The Subjunctive Mood

The Subjunctive Mood The English subjunctive occurs in two forms: the present subjunctive and the past subjunctive. The present subjunctive is derived from the infinitive of a verb and is in the same form for all persons. No distinctions are made between regular and irregular verbs. For example:   to be to have to go ...

Obligation and Necessity (Modals) 8

A. Must / Must not + infinitive without to Must is used: 1. For strong obligation imposed by the speaker. The speaker uses must to express his/her authority. Ex: You must be here by 8 am. (manager to employee) 2. to give strong advice. Ex: It’s a great film. You really must go and see it. ...

Auxiliaries

Auxiliary verbs, as we have seen, are “helping” verbs that add structural meaning or a semantic coloring to verbs carrying the full burden of lexical meaning. All auxiliaries share the ability to be directly followed by not in negative sentences, often in contracted form (They have not gone, We shouldn’t wait), and to be reserved ...