Lexical/Grammatical Collocations: Patterns and Examples 4

  Benson, Benson, and Ilson (1986) categorized English collocations into two classes: lexical collocations and grammatical collocations (with 7 and 8 types respectively); lexical collocations are made up only of verbs, adjectives, nouns and adverbs in different possible combinations while grammatical collocations contain words such as verbs, adjectives or nouns combined with a preposition or a ...

Simple Future Tense

Simple Future Tense
Simple Future Tense Let’s study The Simple Future Tense Now. Here, in this post we have provide you a simple but complete and easy explanation about Simple Future Tense. The simple future tense expresses the actions happen at one particular time in the future. Example: It will snow tomorrow. I shall watch TV tonight. The ...

How to Use Gerunds and Infinitives? 1

How to Use Gerunds and Infinitives?
The gerund and infinitives are used many different cases, such as subject, object, complement, sometimes after the prepositions like “to” and sometimes after certain verbs. Here we have provided you the most complete information on infinitives and gerunds , the usage of them and also some exceptions in using them. A. The gerund is used ...

Do-Did-Done (Irregular Verbs Made Easy) 5

This is not an ordinary table in alphabetical order; here, as far as the sounds and patterns of verb sets are concerned, the three forms of irregular verbs are systematically sorted/presented; thus, they have become easy to memorize. Each category of verb forms is made distinct from the other ones through use of different colors ...

Future Continuous Tense

Future Continuous Tense
Future Progressive (continuous) Tense Here, in this post we have provide you a simple but complete and easy explanation about  Future Progressive (Continuous) Tense. Tom will be sleeping when we arrive. Tom went to sleep at 10.00 tomorrow night. We will arrive at 11.00. The action of sleeping will begin before we arrive, and it ...

Ways to Learn Irregular Verbs Easier…! 3

All new verbs in English are regular. I photocopied the report. She faxed it to me. They emailed everybody about it. I googled my name and got more than 20 000 responses. There are approximately 180 irregular verbs. You don’t need to learn all of them because some of these are very rare but many ...

The Subjunctive Mood

The Subjunctive Mood The English subjunctive occurs in two forms: the present subjunctive and the past subjunctive. The present subjunctive is derived from the infinitive of a verb and is in the same form for all persons. No distinctions are made between regular and irregular verbs. For example:   to be to have to go ...

ACTIVE AND PASSIVE

Active/Passive Voice In English Grammar, sometimes the doer of the action is not mentioned. This happens simply because: • the action, and not the doer/actor of the action, is important. You enter a classroom and you see that “the chairs are arranged in a semi-circle around a table.” The focus is on the action, i.e. ...

Obligation and Necessity (Modals) 8

A. Must / Must not + infinitive without to Must is used: 1. For strong obligation imposed by the speaker. The speaker uses must to express his/her authority. Ex: You must be here by 8 am. (manager to employee) 2. to give strong advice. Ex: It’s a great film. You really must go and see it. ...

Imperative Statements

Imperative Statements
Most imperative statements, or commands, are given in the second-person singular or plural (you). The formation of a verb as an imperative is quite simple: Remove the particle word to from the infinitive, and you have a command: Go home. Have fun. Be happy. Drive slowly.  If you change a statement to a command, the ...